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Easy Roasted Root Vegetables

Listen, things are busy around here, so I’m not going to write a long-winded post. For some reason I feel you’re not sad about that. And honestly, I’m cool with that. I simply want to bring you this awesome recipe so that you have it in time for the holidays. So here it is, my recipe Easy Roasted Root Vegetables!

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The perfect side dish to any holiday meal! These Roasted Brussels Sprouts are festively topped with dried cherries, toasted pumpkin seeds and balsamic reduction! @cookinRD | sarahaasrdn.com

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Sometimes the side dish is the main event. Has that ever been your experience? You sit down to a meal, looking forward to the main dish, only to be completely stunned then completely infatuated with the side dish instead? I love when that happens! I set out recently to make a really fabulous meal, but when all was said and done, the Roasted Brussels Sprouts stole the show. And honestly, I wasn’t sad about it.

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Spatzle That Tastes Darn Good

In case you haven’t been following along on my Instagram account (shame on you!), I’ve been doing this little thing called, “What Was That?” on my Instagram Stories. It’s a weekly series where I break down a cooking method, recipe, ingredient, etc, from the previous week’s episode of Top Chef. Fun, right? Yeah, tune in, you’ll love it! Essentially, I’m trying to make YOU a Top Chef in YOUR kitchen! Last week’s episode was all about German food. So this week, I dedicated my Stories to the beloved German dumpling, spatzle!

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Roasted Cauliflower with Chipotle Cream

Cauliflower is having a moment right now.

Some may argue it’s moment is over, but not me. Never one to shy away from a culinary or food trend, I wanted to give the roasted cauliflower “steak” a try. Well, so here’s the thing about me, I am NOT patient. Not one little bit. So all of that fuss of carefully and perfectly slicing that cauliflower and then to have millions (exaggeration) of pieces of cauliflower fall off – well, it just frustrated the crust out of me!

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Spinach Salad with Macerated Strawberry Dressing

Spinach + Macerated Strawberries = Yummy Salad

It’s probably not too shocking to hear that I love salads. But, let me clarify, I like salads that have lots of flavor and that satisfy. So if I’m building a salad, rest assured that it will taste good, be nutritious and leave you feeling content – like a happy little rabbit. Guaranteed then, that this Spinach Salad with Macerated Strawberry dressing will leave your little white tail twitching with joy.

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Sautéed Mushrooms with Thyme and Bulgur

The Fertility Friday series celebrates the mighty mushroom.

Thank goodness this little fungi is a fertility-friendly food. Mushrooms boast some powerful nutrition – think Vitamin D, selenium and B vitamins such as riboflavin – all nutrients that are beneficial to fertility. In fact you can head on over to Shaw Simple Swaps to learn more about Vitamin D and selenium! But before you go, learn why I think you should include more mushrooms in your diet (even if you’re not struggling with infertility!). I’ve got a super simple recipe that starts with delicious sautéed mushrooms and ends with fresh thyme and toasted pine nuts! Yum!

Let’s focus for a moment on an underlying theme present in most of the foods and recipes we recommend for fertility. That theme is the power of a plant-based way of eating. The research shows that eating more plants is a great way to nourish and fuel your body for fertility. Plant foods contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other nutrients, all of which play a role in making you the most healthy version of yourself, while also preventing chronic disease. And mushrooms, while fungi, make plant-focused eating easy.

Here’s Why You Should Use More Mushrooms In Your Cooking:

  • Umami. Just what is that? It’s the 5th sense of taste and it’s just as important as it’s fellow tastes, sweet, sour, salty and bitter. Umami means “savory” and that’s exactly how mushrooms behave in food applications. They add a “meatiness” when there isn’t any meat and that can leave you feeling more satisfied. It’s an easy way for people to transition into eating more plant-based foods, which leads me to my next point…
  • Interest. If you want people to eat and enjoy their food, it helps if you keep them interested. At least this is what I’ve learned with my work as a chef and dietitian. If the food your prepare has just one note and that note is boring, than no way can you convince yourself or anyone else to eat it. This is where mushrooms can help. Since there are so many varieties, all boasting their own unique flavor, they can instantly add interest and intrigue to a meal. This is a win-win, because you’ll be getting more plant-based foods in while showcasing just how delicious and easy it is to do so. Which takes me to my final point…
  • Flavor. Remember my mention above about each variety of mushroom having it’s own unique flavor? The flavor difference is actually quite amazing and is something many people don’t take advantage of. Cremini mushrooms, for example, have mineral and earthy tones, while shiitakes sharply boast that umami savoriness. Think about how that flavor can boost the flavor of other foods too. Think how amazing sautéed mushrooms taste! That taste means you might need less fat or salt, both of which we don’t necessarily need more of in our diets.

Next time you’re at the grocery store, don’t forget to add mushrooms to your cart. Besides nourishing and fertility-friendly, they’re loaded with satisfying umami, adding interest and flavor to your nourishing fertility-friendly plant-focused way of eating.

Oh and before I forget! For my meat-lovers, have no fear! I’m not saying forgo meat, no way! It has a place on the fertility-friendly food list. But I figure we could all use a little more encouragement when it comes eating more plant-based foods.

Feeling lost? RESOLVE is a non-for-profit that helps people dealing with infertility. They’re a great resource and can even connect you with people in your area going through the same thing. You’re not alone! Feeling inspired? Why not be apart of National Infertility Week and share your blog posts, tweets and Facebook posts about your journey. Use the hashtag #startasking to make it easy for people to follow you on social media.

And here are the beautiful pictures of Sautéed Mushrooms with Bulgur

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Sauteed Mushrooms with Thyme and Bulgur raw

Sauteed Mushrooms with Thyme and Bulgur chopped

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Sautéed Mushrooms with Thyme and Bulgur


  • Author: Sara Haas

Description

Finely chopped mushrooms sautéed until golden then tossed with bulgur, fresh thyme and pine nuts.


Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup bulgur
  • 1 1/2 cups boiling water
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 8 ounces mushrooms (cremini or a blend), cleaned and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot (about 20g)
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped

Instructions

  1. Place bulgur in a medium bowl. Add 1/4 teaspoon Kosher salt, then cover with boiling water. Immediately cover the bowl with a piece of plastic wrap and let bulgur steam for about 20 minutes.
  2. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat, add the pine nuts and toast, stirring occasionally until lightly browned, about 3-4 minutes. Remove from pan and reserve.
  3. Turn heat down to medium, add the olive oil and butter to the skillet. Once butter has melted, add the shallot and saute until softened, about 2-3 minutes. Increase heat to medium high, Add the chopped mushrooms and a sprinkle of salt and continue cooking another 5 minutes.
  4. Remove plastic wrap from the bulgur and drain any excess liquid. Add the mushroom mixture to the bulgur along with the toasted pine nuts, black pepper and fresh thyme and stir to combine. Garnish with extra thyme if desired and serve.

Notes

  • Makes 3 cups

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 6
  • Calories: 115
  • Sugar: 1
  • Sodium: 34
  • Fat: 5
  • Saturated Fat: 2
  • Unsaturated Fat: 3
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 16
  • Protein: 4
  • Cholesterol: 5

Butternut Squash with Brown Sugar Roasted Pecans

It’s getting personal here. I love nuts. Yes, I do. So you can just imagine the absolute joy I experienced when I saw that the theme for this month’s Recipe Redux was nuts. “What!? Really?” I’m pretty sure I gasped that exact sentence when I read the good news. Then, just excitement…what was I going to make to celebrate my love for nuts? Immediately, I went to my new obsession (yes, I have a new one now, pumpkin has taken 2nd place), butternut squash. Just what could I do with that?

Oh yes, yes, I’ve got it, Butternut Squash with Brown Sugar Roasted Pecans!

Um, it’s pure heaven. Because who doesn’t love roasted, sweet butternut squash? And who doesn’t adore candied pecans or tangy feta cheese? Right? And so, how about I put all of those together? Um, ok, done! This one is really good people…it got two thumbs up around here in my house and I have to say that I’ve been going back to my fridge multiple time for big, heaping spoonfuls. Pair it with a roasted chicken or turkey or add it to a salad made with dark greens. And just a word of advice, you’ll want to make a double batch.

The Picture Montage Honoring The Fabulous Butternut Squash with Brown Sugar Roasted Pecans

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Butternut Squash with Brown Sugar Roasted Pecans


  • Author: Sara Haas

Description

A side dish that will make everyone happy. Roasted butternut squash is paired with lightly candied pecans then tossed with fresh thyme and feta cheese.


Ingredients

For the pecans

  • 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea or Kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup whole pecans

For the squash

  • 1 butternut squash (about 1 1/2 pounds), peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • salt, to taste
  • black pepper, to taste

To serve

  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese

Instructions

Prep

  1. Preheat the oven the 400’F and line one large sheet pan with foil or parchment paper and one small sheet pan with foil or parchment paper. Spray both with non-stick cooking spray.

For the pecans

  1. To a medium pot, add the sugar and water and bring to a boil over medium heat. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Add the cinnamon and salt and then the pecans. Cook, stirring constantly, about 1 minute or until mixture has thickened and pecans appear coated. Spread the the pecans out onto the small sheet pan and place in the oven for 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool.

To cook the squash

  1. Place the cubed squash in a large mixing bowl. Add the oil, salt and pepper and toss to coat. Spread the squash out in an even layer onto the prepared, large, rimmed baking sheet. Roast, stirring occasionally, until squash is tender and lightly brown, about 30-35 minutes.
  2. Transfer roasted squash back to the mixing bowl. Roughly chop the pecans and add to the squash along with the thyme and feta cheese. Toss to combine and serve.

Notes

  • This recipe makes about 2 cups squash. About a 1/2 cup serving each for four people.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 4
  • Calories: 143
  • Sugar: 4
  • Sodium: 240
  • Fat: 13
  • Saturated Fat: 2
  • Unsaturated Fat: 11
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 6
  • Protein: 2
  • Cholesterol: 4